Sea Turtle Tracking: STC & Tortuga Moon

Welcome Turtle Tracker! Thank you for supporting sea turtle conservation through your purchase of a Sea Turtle Conservancy & Tortuga Moon turtle tracker t-shirt. Below is a list of turtles actively being tracked on STC’s website. Your purchase gives you exclusive access to this page where you can follow any, or all, the turtles listed below. Just click on the turtle’s image or name to view a map of their movements. If a turtle’s transmitter has not sent a signal for more than 30 days (learn why a transmitter may have stopped and other FAQs), they will be moved to the “Turtles That Are No Longer Transmitting” list.

Active Turtle List
Foxy
Foxy (aka Foxy Charlie) is an adult green sea turtle found on October 1, 2020 in the waters of Islamorada, Florida and entangled in a trap line around a large tumor on its back flipper. She was taken to the Turtle Hospital in Marathon, FL. On October 3, Dr. Brooke removed a tumor that weighed 6 lbs. In early November additional tumors were removed. She was cleared for release and weighed nearly 200 lbs. She was released with a satellite transmitter on Feb 3, 2021.
View migration map.

Last location update: 24 hours
Cumulative distance: 398 km / 247 miles
Foxy
Updated 24 hours ago.
Freckles
Freckles is an adult female leatherback sea turtle that was observed nesting on May 22nd 2020 on Jupiter Island, Florida.  She is an average size Florida leatherback measuring 150.5 cm in curved carapace (shell) length and 107.0 cm curved carapace width. Freckles is taking part in the 2020 Tour de Turtles and was named by her sponsor, Sea Turtle Conservancy.
View migration map.

Last location update: 24 hours
Cumulative distance: 5,404 km / 3,358 miles
Freckles
Updated 24 hours ago.
Gim
Gim is an adult female loggerhead sea turtle released with a satellite transmitter on July 23, 2020 from the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, Florida. She measured 93.3 cm curved carapace (shell) length and 90.3 cm curved carapace width. Gim is taking part in the 2020 Tour de Turtles and was named by her sponsor, gimMe Snack. View migration map.

Last location update: 420 hours
Cumulative distance: 441 km / 274 miles
Gim
Updated 420 hours ago.
Maisy
Maisy, a very special sea turtle was rescued off of Summerland Key on 4th of July, 2019 where she was found covered in tumors. Maisy did not look like the other turtles, she had characteristics of both a hawksbill and a green sea turtle. DNA testing confirmed Maisy is a rare hawksbill/green sea turtle that measured 66.5 cm curved carapace (shell) length. Maisy was treated at the Turtle Hospital for fibropapillomatosis and a severe case of pneumonia. When released, Maisy was feisty, tumor free and back to good health! Her transmitter was sponsored by The Turtle Hospital. View migration map.

Last location update: 23 hours
Cumulative distance: 413 km / 257 miles
Maisy
Updated 23 hours ago.
Rainn
Rainn (in honor of Rainn Wilson) is an adult loggerhead and was rescued by biologists at Inwater Research Group from the St. Lucie Power Plant on Nov 3, 2020. When Rainn arrived, she was extremely lethargic and had barnacles and marine leeches covering the carapace, indicating the turtle has been lethargic and injured for a while. Under treatment by staff at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Facility, Rainn started eating and becoming more active within a week of arrival. On January 26, 2021, Rainn was released with a satellite transmitter to monitor her behavior once back in the wild. View migration map.

Last location update: 0 hours
Cumulative distance: 512 km / 318 miles
Rainn
Updated 0 hours ago.


Turtles That Are No Longer Transmitting

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: There are no new locations on the map for my turtle. Is my turtle dead?
A: Probably not. No new locations is most likely due to the antenna being damaged. It is also possible that the transmitter has fallen off, algae has grown over the sensors that tell the transmitter to send signals, or the batteries that power the transmitter no longer work. It is possible that the transmitter will start sending signals again, especially if it is an algae issue (see next question).

Q: Why are there such long gaps between location dates?
A: There are many possibilities for the irregularity of positions. The satellite transmitters are not always “on.” The transmitters are programmed so that they are “on” for a set number of hours then “off” for a set number of hours. This helps conserve the batteries which power the unit. In order for a location to be collected, a satellite must be in “view” of the transmitter and the turtle must remain at the surface long enough to give the satellite time to receive a signal from the transmitter. So, several things must happen at the same time for a location to be calculated.

Q: All the most recent locations on the map for my turtle are in the same place, why?
A: This is generally a result of a turtle finding a foraging (or feeding) ground. After a nesting season sea turtles migrate to a foraging area. They generally remain in this area until their next nesting season, usually one or two years later. If the location points of the turtle show movements at a closer scale, the large map will have a link to a zoomed in view of the foraging area.

Q: How long will a satellite transmitter send a signal?
A: Ideally, the batteries in these transmitters can last for 8-10 months, but signals often stop prematurely. Ideas about why this is occurring range from problems from algae growing on the transmitter sensors to turtles knocking the devices off as they wedge themselves under rocks. There have been examples of transmitters lasting only a few weeks, but also examples of transmitters lasting for more than 2 years.

Learn more about satellite tracking sea turtles.

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